The Duncan Banner

Homepage

March 27, 2013

Area history preserved by SCHM members

DUNCAN — Did you know that Duncan and Marlow once hosted peanut festivals? Or that Duncan’s first hospital building is still standing at 15th Street and Elm?

These facts and more can be found at the Stephens County Historical Museum, which had its annual Membership Kickoff Dinner on Tuesday evening. This event is usually attended by 100-150 people who care about keeping the history of the county available for the community.

This year marked 19 years since the museum began the membership drive.

“This is a time to remind our members to renew their membership,” said Vicki Zimmerman, president of the Stephens County Historical Society board. “It’s a good social event.”

For years, Betty Davis has made her renowned stew for the meal and people show up for a hearty bowl of it and to show their support of the museum. In order to keep the nonprofit organization running including providing free entrance, the museum depends on membership fees and donations.

The dinner is one of the most important night for the museum, as this is the time where current members pay their dues and when they have the biggest opportunity to acquire new members.

“I want to thank you all for your support of our museum,” said Pee Wee Carey, museum director. “We really appreciate you.”

In previous years, there has always been some form of entertainment after the dinner such as a speaker or musician.  However, this year’s presentation was more of a visual one. Photographs of the Ages is a Powerpoint presentation created by John Jennings, a current member and past president of the Stephens County Historical Society.

The presentation featured photos that have been submitted to the museum over the years and was played throughout dinner. Jennings said he scanned about 120 photos for the slide show.

“I’m passionate about history and the museum deserves it,” he said. “I like digging around and collecting the dots.”

One of the first photos in the slide show is that of Ray Mason and Ted Gilbert hanging a sign on the first day of the SCHM’s opening on Sept. 4, 1977. The banner reads, “Let’s Preserve Our Heritage,” which is exactly what the museum and its members continue to strive for.

1
Text Only
Local News
4-22 Tyee Percival OBIT.jpg

Tyee Percival

Features
Sports
Education
Opinion
  • Governor, state Legislature have misplaced priorities

    If the Oklahoma State Legislators and our Governor spent less time interfering in women’s rights to manage their bodies, creating ways to lay more taxes and fees on the middle class in order to generate more tax breaks which benefit only the wealthy while also conceiving methods with which to fill Oklahoma’s for-profit prisons, they would be doing all of us a favor. Instead, why not work to enhance funding for our schools and wage increases for all school employees? While reforming the state’s educational budget, why don’t they approve wage increases for our Oklahoma State Troopers and enlarge their Academy to insure qualified individuals are ready to fill the upcoming vacancies as many of the older force retire?

    April 9, 2014

  • Self government key to keeping politicians in check

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that federal campaign laws that limit the total amount of money donors can give to political parties, committees and candidates for federal office (U.S. House, Senate, and President) was unconstitutional. The ruling will not increase the current $2,600 limit on how much a donor can give to a federal candidate in each primary and general election or the $32,400 limit that can go to a national party committee. Those limits are still in place.  The ruling will instead remove the limit on how many candidates/committees to which a donor can contribute.

    April 9, 2014