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December 8, 2013

Winter weather continues

DUNCAN — Temperatures dropped to 10 degrees. Freezing rain and snow fell, covering roads and yards. Through all of it, one thing was certain: Winter weather had come to Duncan.

In fact, about 0.23 inches of precipitation fell between 10:30 a.m. Thursday and about 9 a.m. Friday. By Friday afternoon, snow drifts ranged from about 2 inches up to 4 inches. And high temperatures leveled out at 25 degrees.

Many government entities were closed Friday, including all Stephens County schools. Duncan High School students were dismissed at 2 p.m. Thursday, buses ran about 2:30 p.m. and all students were dismissed Friday.

“We’re just going to take it one day at a time,” Duncan Superintendent Sherry Labyer said. “I’m glad we could finish out the day (Thursday). We did run buses about an hour early.”

Labyer said no determination has been made on whether Duncan students will return to school Monday. Instead, she said the school district will be watching the weather.

“We’re going to error on the side of student safety,” Labyer said. “We don’t know what Monday will hold.”

The City of Duncan closed down about an hour early Thursday, with employees leaving about 4:30 p.m. All city offices, including the payment center, were closed Friday because of the weather.

Stephens County had a similar reaction to the weather. The Stephens County Courthouse  was closed Friday. The Oklahoma Corporation Commission also closed Friday because of the weather.

Although the City of Duncan was closed, several city employees worked Friday, including Duncan firefighters, police officers and street employees. Street employees worked to spread sand over various roadways throughout the city. Duncan firefighters and police officers responded to at least one structure fire and several vehicle accidents.

According to the Weather Channel website, temperatures will stays at or below freezing until Tuesday, when the high will be at 35 degrees. No precipitation is predicted for the coming week, with the exception of 30 percent chance on Saturday.

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