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July 18, 2013

DPS board accepts bid for asbestos abatement

DUNCAN — As part of a major remodeling project at Duncan High School, the Duncan Board of Education approved a $152,244 bid for asbestos abatement at the school.

During Tuesday’s regular meeting, the board awarded the project to A&M Quality Asbestos.

Like the rest of the high school remodeling project, the asbestos abatement component will be paid for with bond funds from a bond election on Feb. 14, 2012. Securing the bonds was approved by a super-majority vote of Duncan voters.

“This will cover phases 1, 2 and 3, but not the alternatives,” Superintendent Sherry Labyer said.

The school board had discussed awarding the asbestos project during the June 25 meeting, but only one bid had been submitted. At that time, the board rejected the bidding and extended the time period to attract more bids.

At 2 p.m. Tuesday, bids were opened for the project, with three companies entering bids on the project.

“We just had one guy who had a bid last time,” Assistant Superintendent Rodney Calhoun said. “This was a whole lot better.”

Although A&M Quality Asbestos was awarded the project based on its bid, two other companies had also submitted bids — Environmental Action and Tec-An Inc. For the total of phases 1 through 3, Environmental Action made a bid of $335,017, and Tec-An submitted a bid of $203,050.

Additionally, the three companies submitted bids for two alternatives, the EDGE Academy in the west building of the campus and the art building.

The bids for the first alternative (EDGE Academy in the west building) included Environmental Action at $72,530, Tec-An at $37,500 and A&M at $18,951.

For the second alternative (art building), the three companies submitted separate bids for piping and floors. Environmental Action submitted a bid of $51,130 for piping and $40,400 for floors. Tec-An’s bids included $30,950 for piping and $21,250 for floors. A&M submitted bids of $43,115 for piping and $10,270 for floors.

Labyer’s recommendation to the school board was to just approve the first three phases and to forgo the two alternatives.

Calhoun said the school board has some time to go back and approve the bids on the alternative if the board chooses to do so. Whether this occurs would be based partially on remaining funds.

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