The Duncan Banner

Homepage

February 15, 2013

Funding tops list of concerns

DUNCAN —  

A loss of funding is leaving school districts across the state unsure of what comes next.
Several superintendent meetings took place Wednesday in Oklahoma City, where many local superintendents learned more about what’s happening in the state and national legislature, and what impact the legislature could have on area school districts. Among those attending were Duncan Superintendent Sherry Labyer and Assistant Superintendent Glenda Cobb and also Comanche Superintendent Terry Davidson.
“We had a series of meetings, legislative kinds of meetings,”  Cobb said. “Our concerns are related to the loss of funding.”
Cobb focused on SB-766, which is about intangible property taxes. School districts across the state depend on ad valorem taxes to help with school funding, especially when it comes to bond issues, Cobb said, but this approved bill will be taking some of that funding away.
She said there is no way to predict what kind of impact this could have on Duncan Public Schools, especially with the current bond issue. Construction is set to begin in May.
Both Labyer and Cobb attended a Suburban Schools Committee, at which they were told this would be $110 per weighted ADM.
“That could be in excess of $500,000 for Duncan,” Cobb said. “On the other hand, ad valorem is up in Duncan. We don’t know if that loss will be made up by the increase. We’re cautiously optimistic.”
The impact of SB-766 has also drawn attention of senators themselves, Cobb said.
She said Sen. John Ford, (R) District 29, called for an increase of funding for schools to offset the Senate bill.
“‘Calling for’ and ‘getting’ are two different things,” Cobb said. “It’s nice to know there are people doing things on behalf of Oklahoma children.”
Davidson also kept busy with a meeting Wednesday. Davidson is a member of the Oklahoma Association of School Administration, a board Labyer also serves on.

Text Only
Local News
4-24 Velma Team Roping Kids.jpg

Velma teens Brodie Williams, left, and Tyler Ray took home a team roping victory from the Heart of Oklahoma Youth Rodeo Association.

Features
Sports
Education
Opinion
  • Governor, state Legislature have misplaced priorities

    If the Oklahoma State Legislators and our Governor spent less time interfering in women’s rights to manage their bodies, creating ways to lay more taxes and fees on the middle class in order to generate more tax breaks which benefit only the wealthy while also conceiving methods with which to fill Oklahoma’s for-profit prisons, they would be doing all of us a favor. Instead, why not work to enhance funding for our schools and wage increases for all school employees? While reforming the state’s educational budget, why don’t they approve wage increases for our Oklahoma State Troopers and enlarge their Academy to insure qualified individuals are ready to fill the upcoming vacancies as many of the older force retire?

    April 9, 2014

  • Self government key to keeping politicians in check

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that federal campaign laws that limit the total amount of money donors can give to political parties, committees and candidates for federal office (U.S. House, Senate, and President) was unconstitutional. The ruling will not increase the current $2,600 limit on how much a donor can give to a federal candidate in each primary and general election or the $32,400 limit that can go to a national party committee. Those limits are still in place.  The ruling will instead remove the limit on how many candidates/committees to which a donor can contribute.

    April 9, 2014