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February 7, 2014

Bray-Doyle players speak out against coach

BRAY — Three players on the Bray-Doyle boys basketball team say their coach instructed them how to physically injure opponents when they dunk.

The Bray-Doyle superintendent denied the allegations.

“The school has investigated it. There’s nothing to substantiate it, and we have handled the situation,” he said.

Coach Doug Bond, who is serving in his first year with the team and is also the school district’s athletic director, declined to comment.

These players, however, insist they’re telling the truth.

“When we played Central, that’s when it really started.” said senior Sam Henderson, who is no longer on the team after he quit during the season. “He was like ‘I promise you if he dunks, he’ll only dunk it once.’ Then he kind of smiled.”

Bray-Doyle sophomore Jacob Henderson supported his teammate’s allegation. Bond taught the the players how to hurt their opponents during practice sessions, the underclassmen said.

“He said stick your head under their chin and don’t catch them on the way down,” Henderson said. “I told him I wasn’t going to do it to my own players and he said well are you going to do it to the other team. I told him no.”

Henderson said the players didn’t want to obey Bond’s orders to hurt opposing players.

“Yeah, he says to do it, but the only way it can happen is if the player does it,” Henderson said. “It’s not like he can do it. Yeah, it made me uncomfortable, but I wasn’t going to do it. I wasn’t going to hurt somebody like that.”

Bray-Doyle lost 61-31 at Central High on Jan. 4. Central High’s coach John Nease said he was unaware of the situation when he asked senior John Repp to not dunk the ball on the last possession of the game. He still thought it was an odd moment because the Bray-Doyle team immediately retreated away from the basket when Repp had the ball.

“It was kind of awkward,” Nease said.

Senior Cody Matthews was another player who disagreed with his coach’s tactics.

“He said box their legs out,” Matthews said. “When they come over the top of you don’t catch them, because when they land on their face, I promise you they won’t try to go over your back again.”

Four days before the game between Bray-Doyle and Velma-Alma on Jan. 31 Matthews texted a message to his friend on the other team, Jaz Gayanich, to warn him about his coach’s tactics.

He said he felt it was important to warn him.

“The way that I look at it, it’s kind of like bullying,” Matthews said. “If I see some random kid at school being bullied, I would want to stop it. But it being my best friend, I’m going to make dang sure I’m going to get it stopped.”

Gayanich told his father Joe, who said he called the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association. He spoke with David Glover, administrator of basketball for Classes B through 4A,  who said the matter had to be handled by the two schools.

“I said if we’ve got a coach who’s being a bad egg, and he’s starting this, that’s the last thing we need,” Joe Gayanich said.

Matthews said the school superintendent called him into the office on Jan. 30 to talk with him and the coach. Eads asked Matthews about the text message sent to the student’s friend on the Velma-Alma team, and when Matthews showed him the message on his phone, Eads grabbed it, Matthews said.

 The superintendent started reading all the text messages on the phone, Matthews said,

and accused of being disloyal to his  school and coach.

“I was like ‘You’re blowing this out of proportion,’” Matthews said. “Every time I tried to talk he was like, ‘Shut up. I’m talking right now. If you don’t like it, you can just take your butt home right now.’”

Matthews’ father Joe was upset how his son was treated. He serves as Bray-Doyle’s baseball coach, but said he doubts he’ll continue coaching there.

He said he was most distraught with Eads and Bond threatening to kick his son out of school. Matthews was not suspended.

The day Matthews was summoned into the superintendent’s office, Bond addressed the boys basketball team and told them he didn’t intend to tell any of them to hurt an opponent, said Jacob Henderson.

“I’m like, that’s exactly what you said, is to hurt somebody if they dunk,” Henderson said. “He would say that after he got in trouble for it. Well he didn’t really get in trouble, but it backfired on him.”

Two members of the Bray-Doyle school board, Wilroy Heck and Eric Dorman, said  they knew nothing of the controversy or the superintendent’s  investigation. The other three board members could not be reached.

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