The Duncan Banner

April 29, 2013

Mark Twain students get easy lesson in recycling

Derrick Miller
The Duncan Banner

DUNCAN — Mark Twain students learned the ins and outs of recycling.

During a recycling program Friday, the students learned more about the recycling program being instituted by Waste Connections for Duncan, Marlow and Comanche. The program goes into effect May 6 and will include a twice-monthly recycling pickup schedule.

Justin Hicks, Waste Connections employee, demonstrated what types of items can be recycled, including aluminum cans, plastic drink bottles and plastic laundry detergent bottles.

“About 70 percent of the trash you throw away can be recycled,” Hicks said.

Earlier in the school year, the students constructed an igloo of milk jugs.

The igloo was disassembled so the students could contribute to the recycling efforts.

The students dropped the gallon jugs into the recycling cart, which was then picked up by the recycling truck and dumped into the truck. In all, there were about 450 milk jugs.

While the program’s start is only one week away, the conversation about recycling has been ongoing since June 2012. It wasn’t until January that members of the South Central Oklahoma Environmental Authority signed to officially bring the curbside recycling program to the three cities, all of which are represented by SCOEA.

Hicks said Waste Connections employees will sort through the recycling, which will be released onto a conveyor belt.

The items allowed to be collected through the recycling efforts include newspaper, other types of paper, plastic bottles, aluminum cans, cardboard and glass. Some things not allowed include plastic bags, light bulbs and food scraps.

As he talked with the students, Hicks mentioned the need for recycling. He said it greatly reduces the amount of trash going into the landfill, which helps prolong the use of that landfill.

He said the Rewards Program  cost $5 a month to participate in, but the average person gets between $10 to $20 in rewards each month.

Points are distributed evenly to all participants on a recycle collection route. He said there are about 1,100 people on each route.

“We are not sure what the rewards will be yet,” Hicks said. “We’re wanting to work with local vendors to keep the money in the community.”