The Duncan Banner

October 9, 2013

Council OKs Waurika Lake annual payment

Derrick Miller
The Duncan Banner

DUNCAN — Regardless of the decreasing water level at Waurika Lake, the lake continues to be the main water source for the City of Duncan.

During Tuesday’s regular meeting, the Duncan City Council approved the city’s annual payment of $660,722.25 to the Waurika Lake Master Conservancy District. This annual payment came from a Jan. 10, 1978, contract and an amended contract dated Oct. 22, 2002.

“This project was approved by six communities that agreed to build the lake,” City Manager Jim Frieda said.

The annual payment goes toward paying off the debt of the lake construction and to secure water rights to 33.33 percent of the lake for the City of Duncan.

The initial debt of the city was $13,201,264.62. After the approved payment Tuesday, the city owes $7,469,826.28. The approved payment includes the principal payment of $388,342.68 and the payment on the interest in the amount of $252,379.57.

David Taylor, of the Waurika Lake Master Conservancy District, represented the Conservancy District at Tuesday’s meeting. Frieda did most of the talking about the item, but Councilmen Tommy Edwards and Ricky Mayes joked about the declining water volume of the lake and the on-going drought impacting the area. Waurika Lake is down to 44 percent of its water capacity.

“I don’t think we should pay until we have some water in the lake,” Edwards said.

“I don’t think we should be paying for a dry lake,” Mayes said.

With the jokes out of the way, Taylor responded with one of his own.

“Valves turn on and values turn off,” Taylor said.

Mayor Gene Brown said the best thing for the lake and the six communities tied to the lake would be rain.

After the meeting, Duncan Public Works Director Scott Vaughn said Waurika and the four Duncan lakes are continuing to decline in water volume because of the drought.

He said Duncan lakes have dropped to 49 percent.

“We need rain badly, badly,” Vaughn said. “Any week you go without rain, it’s going to get worse.”

In other action:

n The council awarded the bid to Volvo Rents, for a self-propelled concrete saw, in the amount of $19,625.60.

Frieda said this item was listed on the Fiscal Year 2013 budget in the amount of $25,000, which puts it under budget.

“The one in use is 9 years old,” Frieda said. “It’s used every day. It has been repaired several times this year.”

n Council members approved the purchase of Slunk Enterprise Perpetual from Carasoft Technology Corp. This software cost $5,924.44.

Duncan Police Captain Jay Evans said the software is designed to read data, from water usage to computer security.

“You have a bunch of mundane logs, and this makes it easier to look at,” Evans said. “It makes it easier to see if you have a problem. The city can use it with a lot of different applications.”