The Duncan Banner

May 16, 2013

Rain brings some relief

Toni Hopper
The Duncan Banner

DUNCAN — A moisture filled pressure system moved into southern Oklahoma Wednesday, and with it — a sigh of relief from many people.

“I’m squeezing out my shirt,” Duncan City Manager Jim Frieda said when The Banner called him on an unrelated story.

“We prayed for this rain for two months but I didn’t expect to get two months of rain all at once.”

Unfortunately though, Frieda said surveys have shown that it will take about three days of rain to make a considerable difference in the lake levels.

“I don’t know what’s happening down in Jefferson County,” he said.

The rain began around 11:30 a.m. Wednesday and when it did, it came down in torrents. On and off it rained like that for most of the day, with another big drop around 4:30 p.m. By 5 p.m., The Banner’s official National Weather Service rain gauge had 1.40 inches of rain water in it.

The Banner also received a couple of phone calls that the popular storm chasers, known as Reed Timmer and his team, had been seen driving south on U.S. Highway 81 through Duncan after 3 p.m. A quick check on his Facebook page indicated he was headed south to check out a storm system that was indicating a 30 percent chance of producing a tornado.

The NWS had also issued a severe thunderstorm warning for Stephens County in mid-afternoon, with the possibility of hail and strong damaging winds, but as of 7 p.m. no hail had been reported in Duncan.

Temperatures were at 61 degrees at 7 p.m. Wednesday.

Temperatures could be in the upper 90s, pushing 100 degrees on Friday. Four area graduations are scheduled — 6 p.m. at Central High; and 7 p.m. for Comanche, Marlow and Empire High School.

On Saturday, another storm system is expected to establish, with a dryline, that could produce tornados.