The Duncan Banner

May 3, 2013

Water supply concerns continue for Waurika Lake

Derrick Miller
The Duncan Banner

DUNCAN — Water conservation may no longer be optional.

During Thursday’s Duncan Chamber of Commerce and Industry community breakfast, Dave Taylor, with Waurika Lake Conservancy District, talked about the declining water supply in the lake, as caused by a prolonged drought. Taylor said people need to start thinking about how much water they’re using and start coming up with ideas to scale back.

“The drought does not sleep,” Taylor said. “We have developed a culture for a wet community, as it’s been for the last 30 years.

“The one thing we can control is consumption.”

For months, the communities served by Waurika Lake have shown concern about how long the water supply will last if the drought doesn’t let up. For the City of Duncan, Waurika Lake is the primary water supply, although the city does have four other lakes that could help.

Taylor said at this rate, Waurika Lake has about 1 1/2 to two years of water left. But if people reduce the amount of water they use, this could help prolong the use of the lake if the drought continues for a prolonged period of time.

“All the cities have good plans for the drought,” Taylor said. “We’re asking people to conserve.”

Taylor did have a list of 100 ways for people to save water, while performing ordinary tasks. Some of the tips he borrowed from Lawton and Wichita Falls, Texas.

The tips ranged from watering the lawn in the morning or evening to reduce evaporation to washing a car on the lawn to clean the car and water the lawn, from running the washing machine only when it’s full to repairing dripping facets as soon as possible.

He said, minding the remaining water in Waurika Lake, takes the cooperation of everyone. He said the time has come for people to start reducing their water usage.

“It’s not when to; it’s how to,” Taylor said.