The Duncan Banner

August 26, 2013

DLT hosts 'The Gin Game'

Derrick Miller
The Duncan Banner

DUNCAN — Duncan Little Theatre lent a hand to a fellow community theater group by helping host a performance Saturday night.

The Broken Arrow Community Playhouse performed “The Gin Game,” but DLT hosted the performance at the Simmons Center to help the Broken Arrow group raise money to get closer to the Mont-Laurier International Theatre Festival in September in Quebec, Canada.

The community theater group won regionals in 2010 with “The Gin Game,” the same year DLT took the play “Almost, Maine” to the Oklahoma Community Theatre Association Festival. Because OCTAFest allowed for performances of up to 60 minutes, the Broken Arrow group only got to perform the second act, which was all DLT’s Sharon Burum got to see.

Burum directed “Almost, Maine,” which put her in the audience for Broken Arrow’s OCTA performance.

“There’s no time limit in the Canadian festival,” Burum said. “They get to do both acts. They consider it a privilege to perform here.”

In addition to bringing in the Broken Arrow group, the OCTA Board members were in the audience. Burum said this was the first time some of the board members got an opportunity to see the play. Each of the tickets sold went toward the miles it will take for the theater group to get to the international festival. About 30 people were in attendance.

Martha Cherbini, the director of the play, said the Broken Arrow group was excited to use the Simmons Center Theatre because it is among the nicest venues the group has performed in.

Cherbini said the Simmons Center may even be better than the theater the group performs in during the international festival. She said the venue may help set the atmosphere.

“It’s going to be an adventure,” she said of the international festival. “We’re going to have fun. We’ll see some interesting theater.”

The international festival will bring people from around the world, including groups from Russia, Finland and Venezuela. She said there will probably be a language barrier, but the emotions from each group will help tell the story.

“The biggest challenge is where we’re going it’s all French Canadian,” Cherbini said.